Services for Mums

CPS offers social, emotional and practical support to vulnerable, new or expectant mothers.

"It is perfect, particularly for people who don't have family. When you are isolated, it's that extra link you really need." Emily, mum of Luke (6), Rebekah (3) and Lucy (1)

Mentoring Mums

Mentoring mumMentoring Mums is an early intervention and prevention program working with vulnerable and expectant mothers. Mums who participate in the program come from diverse backgrounds and are experiencing a degree of social isolation and vulnerability.

Mentors are volunteers who are mothers themselves and come from a broad cross section of the community. They are the mothers of young children, grandmothers, working mums and have a vast range of experience including nursing, social work, teaching, early education and their own personal experiences of being a mum.

Volunteer Mentors are recruited and undergo induction and comprehensive training that covers topics such as; child development, attachment and bonding, child abuse and reporting, communication, family violence, post-natal depression and child vehicle safety.

The Mentor works with mum to build a trusting and consistent relationship, visiting her at home and spending time getting to know her and her child.  Mentors support mum in her parenting role and assists in connecting her to the community, encouraging access to health services, maternal and child health programs, parenting services and other community groups. 

For more information or to register your interest as a volunteer, please contact: Mentoring Mums Coordinator;

Tel        (03) 9474 4819

Fax       (03) 9460 1635

Email:   cps@cps.org.au

Mentoring Mums brochure

Mothers in Mind

Mothers in Mind is an early intervention program that assists mothers who have experienced hurtful events, to overcome their personal trauma and become the parent they want to be for their young child. The program is currently being piloted in Victoria.

“My son is sleeping through the night. I have stopped screaming and fighting with him so much.”

 

Overcoming Painful Experiences to Become Better Mothers

Mothers in MindMothers in Mind is a trauma and attachment informed, mother and child play-based group program for mothers who have experienced abuse or trauma in their life, and have pre-school children under the age of four.

The Child Development Institute (CDI), an accredited children’s mental health agency in Canada offering early intervention, family violence and early learning programs, initially developed the program in 2006. The CDI will operate in partnership with CPS to launch this program in Victoria.

The program focuses on the needs of mothers who have found that their hurtful experiences, such as family violence and sexual abuse, have made parenting difficult.

 

Benefits of the Program

The structured 10-week program is founded on the evidence-based theory that attachment & trauma informed intervention reduces stress and isolation, and improves parenting competency and emotional closeness.

The program is centred on structured playgroup sessions, but involves a clinical approach. Facilitators work to observe and attend to moments of connection and disconnection, make assessments, and follow up with mothers between sessions.

Mothers in Mind enables mothers to:

  • Mothers in Mind2Talk about parenting issues and learn from other mothers who have had similar experiences
  • Build a positive mother-child relationship through spending quality time playing with their child
  • Discover helpful ways to cope with their anger, worry and stress in a safe and supportive environment
  • Increase their confidence in responding to their children in a sensitive and caring manner
  • Learn how to support young children who may also have been expose to hurtful behaviours.
  • Explore and learn what helps children feel safe and secure
  • Bond with other participants to reduce mother-child isolation
  • Find practical ways to take some time out for themselves during this busy stage of life.

 

“This is an opportunity to rebuild a positive parent-child relationship, and in doing so, nurture and support young children who have been exposed to hurtful behaviours. 

Mothers can learn from other mothers who have had similar experiences, and together, grow their skills and build back their confidence in a safe and secure environment. 

By helping children at this early stage, we can help limit the negative impact that family violence has on their life trajectory.” 

– Dr Angelique Jenney, Child Development Institute Toronto